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International Moon Day 2024

July 20 @ 15:30 - 21:00

Buzz Aldrin in Space Suit climbs down the Eagle's ladder to the surface. of the moonNASA

20 July 2024

International Moon Day marks the anniversary of the first moon landing. In the 21st century, humanity is determined to go back.  Learn more at one of our two sessions held on International Moon Day 2024.

3.30-5.00 pm (Junior Afternoon Session)

Are your kids fascinated by the moon and moon landings? In this family oriented session: you’ll learn with interactive activities about the different features of the moon and where humans have landed on the moon. and why you can sometimes see the moon in the daytime. Take a photo of the moon if clear and we can send it to you by sms.

7.00-9.00pm (Night Session)

Want to learn how to identify various features on the Moon including where various lunar missions have landed? We’ll have telescopes and astronomers present to help you do just that. There will be Moon and stellar object viewing with our telescopes, an astronomical talk and a tour of our historic observatory.

Dress for cold Ballarat Weather as it can be very chilly. If Cloudy, the event will still go ahead with our virtual night sky program in place of viewing at the telescopes.

 

Bookings are essential and will close two hours prior to session start time.


Activities:

Got your tickets for you and the family but can’t wait to explore the moon? Have a go at one or more of these activites at home.

Track the moon:

Did you know the moon has different shapes called phases? The different phases of the moon happen because on different days we can see different amounts of the daytime and night time sides of the moon. Print off a blank calendar page, and each day draw a picture of the moon and watch how the shape changes over time. You can also note down what time of day you saw the moon and in what direction. What does this tell you about the apparent motion of the moon?

Spy on the moon:

Have you got a pair of binoculars or a telescope laying around at home? Give them a clean and have a look the moon. Count the number of craters you can see.

Tip: craters are best seen on the terminator – the line between the night time and day time side of the moon.

 

Help NASA as a citizen scientist at MoonDiff

NASA is seeking citizen scientists (that could be you!) to help them work out the rate the moon gets new craters. On MoonDiff you will identify the difference in two images of the moon, check for differences (i.e. new craters) and identify new craters. visit https://trek.nasa.gov/moondiff/ to give it a go!

 

Take A photo of the Moon

Take your own photo or we can help you take a photo and then send it to you by sms.

 

Moon Phase Oreos:

At home using Oreos, emulate the different phases of the moon. What are their names? What is the order of the phases that we see from Australia? (Hint: we live in the Southern Hemisphere.) What order would you see from Canada? How about from Indonesia?
How to guide: https://www.nps.gov/teachers/classrooms/moon-phases-with-cookies.htm 

 

Help name a Quasi-Moon:

The International Astronomical Union and RadioLab are holding a naming contest for one of Earth’s Quasi-Moons. Entries are open until September and voting will happen in October. Link: https://woobox.com/wc2qxd 

Details

Date:
July 20
Time:
15:30 - 21:00

Venue

Ballarat Observatory
439 Cobden St
Mount Pleasant, Victoria 3350 Australia
+ Google Map

Details

Date:
July 20
Time:
15:30 - 21:00

Venue

Ballarat Observatory
439 Cobden St
Mount Pleasant, Victoria 3350 Australia
+ Google Map
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